High profile homicide of Alberta teen Kelly Cook remains unsolved after 35 years

Written by admin on 26/04/2020 Categories: 老域名购买

For 35 years, the family of Kelly Cook has waited for answers. Decades have come and gone, but still, the 15-year-old’s death remains a mystery.

Marnie Kathol is Kelly’s younger sister. She fights back tears whenever she talks about her loss.

“I feel ripped off,” Kathol said. “I feel my family has been ripped off…and my family now–my children.”

“It’s shocking that we’re still sitting here 35 years later still talking about it, with no more answers than we had 35 years ago basically.”

Watch archive below: Files upon files fill RCMP shelves, but investigators said they were no closer to finding Kelly Cook’s killer on August 31, 2010 than they were in 1981. Nancy Hixt has the details of the mysterious case.

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April 22, 1981 started out like a normal day in the small farming community of Standard, Alta., about 70 kilometres northeast of Calgary.

Kelly got a phone call from a man using the name Bill Christensen, who said he wanted a babysitter. Another girl had turned him down, and gave him Kelly’s number.

Hours later, a car showed up at the Cook family home. That was the last time Kelly was seen alive.

“I remember going to bed and waking up probably after midnight and the police were already there,” Kathol said.

The RCMP started their investigation just four hours after Kelly was taken.

Watch archive video below: There was new hope in the case of the disappearance of Kelly Cook in September 2010, when police reopened their investigation less than 24 hours after a Global News story. Nancy Hixt reports.

For weeks, searchers scoured rural properties and outbuildings.

Two months later, Kelly’s body was found in an irrigation canal south of Taber. She had to be identified through dental records.

“We have a lot of questions, but it’s kind of scary to think that we might one day have the answers, and they might not be what we are looking for.”

Investigators have worked tirelessly on the case for decades.

There’s a special room dedicated to the files for the Cook homicide, it’s filled to the roof with boxes and boxes of evidence.

More than 2,000 possible suspects have been looked at, and police confirm the investigation remains active.

RCMP believe this was a well-planned crime.

They have a sketch of the man they believe is responsible, but no arrests have ever been made.

“It’s just life now,” said Kathol. “It’s just what we’ve had to learn to live with. There’s no acceptance in it, there’s no ‘closure,’ if you want to use that word.”

While the Cook family has always hoped for justice, after 35 years, they say the thought of an arrest is almost as scary as living with the mystery.

“If it all changed tomorrow and we had all those answers, I don’t know if any of us are prepared for that. Justice makes that individual accountable, but it doesn’t bring her home, it doesn’t change it.”

A $100,000 reward is being offered by the Village of Standard for information leading to the arrest and conviction of Kelly’s killer. Anyone with information is asked to call the Serious Crimes Branch South Airdrie “K” (AB) Division at 403-420-4900 or Crime Stoppers 1-800-222-8477.

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Winnipeg’s Convention Centre turns purple for Prince

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WINNIPEG —; Prince died at the age of 57 on Thursday and the RBC Convention Centre in Winnipeg honoured the passing of the music legend Thursday evening.

He died in home in Minnesota according to his publicist.

READ MORE: Prince dead at 57

The RBC Convention Centre tweeted out two photos of purple lights around the building in honour of the pop superstar, who was known for the hit song Purple Rain.

READ MORE: Prince had special connection to Toronto, site of one of his final shows

Prince’s real name was Prince Rogers Nelson and he was born June 6, 1958 in Minneapolis, Minn.

Prince’s death touches Canadian fans

02:15

Prince’s death touches Canadian fans

02:05

Montrealers remember Prince, dead at 57

00:32

Fans honour Prince with dance party outside Apollo Theatre

02:58

Music world, fans shocked by sudden death of Prince

00:48

Fans at Rock and Roll Hall of Fame react to passing of Prince

00:42

Prince fan: ‘Too many memories’

00:43

Prince, iconic musician, dead at 57



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More concerns raised about treatment of suicidal people in NS emergency rooms

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More concerns are being raised about how suicidal people are cared for in emergency departments in Nova Scotia.

A spokesperson said yesterday that the Nova Scotia Health Authority is aware some people it sends away do end up committing suicide.

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“It’s not shocking,” said Bev Cadham, a co-manager for the Canadian Mental Health Association‘s Halifax-Dartmouth branch.

She said going to an emergency room for help is a huge effort on the part of the person struggling.

“We need to provide the services they require in a timely manner and address them in that moment,” said Cadham.

That requires more funding for mental health services, preventative measures in particular, she added.

More stories of being sent home despite telling emergency services staff about being suicidal have are being brought forward after a woman detailed her friend’s situation on Tuesday.

When asked about the issue in Province House Thursday afternoon, Jamie Baillie, leader of the Progressive Conservative Party of Nova Scotia, said more needs to be done by the provincial government.

“These are lives that can be saved if they get the treatment they need. This is a crisis,” he told reporters.

“This could be an area that we do need to take a look at,” said Leo Glavine, the province’s minister of health and wellness, when asked about the issue prior.

Laura Burke said she was turned away from a Nova Scotia emergency room on two occasions a decade ago while feeling suicidal.

“Finally, after a mild, sort of, half-hearted attempt, I was admitted,” she said.

Burke has since gotten better and become a psychotherapist.

Suicidal people who are sent home from emergency rooms are given options for other care, including through the Mental Health Mobile Crisis Team and Community Mental Health Services.

That treatment works for a number of people but Burke said, through her experience, there can be significant wait times for that help.

“So it’s just not adequate, and it’s a really high-risk thing to do,” she added.

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Mike Duffy regains access to Senate office and resources after acquittal

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OTTAWA – After a three-year hiatus from his third-floor office in the Centre Block, Mike Duffy was let back into the Senate on Thursday, with access once again to the full resources of the upper chamber.

Senate officials announced his full standing within hours of a verdict that cleared Duffy of 31 charges.

But the decision does not end the Senate expenses scandal.

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One current and one retired senator still face trials for questionable housing expenses. And seven former senators face the possibility of being taken to the court by the Senate itself if they don’t hand over almost $528,000 for improper expenses by the end of Friday.

It all means there are still open wounds in the Senate from the spending scandal that rocked the upper chamber for three years – at times sidetracking senators from debating legislation and delivering a blow to the credibility of its members.

READ MORE: Mike Duffy trial: Judge dismisses all charges against Duffy

“It’s been a difficult time for the Senate for the last three years,” said independent Sen. John Wallace from New Brunswick.

“It’s obviously affected the senators who have been suspended, those who have been charged, but it affects all of us. All of our reputations have suffered, our credibility. But we’re going to build that back.”

The verdict and Duffy’s return to the Senate will be a reminder to anyone in the upper chamber about the need to be careful with their spending: Become sloppy and your fellow senators will punish you the way they did Duffy.

Duffy lost access to his office and Senate expense account three years ago when he was suspended without pay. The same fate befell senators Patrick Brazeau and Pamela Wallin.

Brazeau faces his own fraud and breach of trust trial this year over housing expenses, and Wallin’s expense file has been with the RCMP for three years.

Duffy gained back his salary last summer when Parliament was dissolved for the election, as did Brazeau and Wallin, but not the other perks of the job until his acquittal Thursday on 31 criminal charges stemming from his Senate expenses.

Experts say that for Brazeau, the ruling could influence how the court sees his fraud and breach of trust charges over his housing expenses, which he has always maintained were proper. And for Wallin, it could mean a fresh look at the criminal investigation that has gone on for three years without any charges laid or the allegations against her tested in court.

The case against the Prince Edward Island senator launched a sweeping change in the oversight and guidelines for senators’ spending, with a probing audit of senators’ expenses. That audit found problems with the spending of 30 senators, 24 of whom have since been cleared by the RCMP of any criminal conduct.

WATCH: Duffy’s lawyer says senate needs to ‘create clear rules’ for what senators can, can’t do

01:58

WATCH: Duffy’s lawyer says senate needs to ‘create clear rules’ for what senators can, can’t do

01:07

Mike Duffy leaves courtroom after judge dismisses him of all charges

02:49

‘This was a resounding not guilty’: Duffy’s lawyer on judge dismissing all charges against senator

01:37

Judge dismisses first two charges against Mike Duffy

00:39

Mike Duffy arrives to face verdict on Senate expense charges

00:38

West Block primer: Senator Mike Duffy trial



After the Duffy scandal first broke, senators and then MPs agreed to post more details of their spending. The Senate reworked its spending rules on multiple occasions, laying out more guidelines for trips and residency claims as two outside auditing firms, the auditor general and a former Supreme Court justice raised questions about their clarity.

Ontario Court Justice Charles Vaillancourt, after reading his verdict in Duffy’s criminal trial, suggested more work needs to be done.

He pointed out that the Senate had made “significant changes, moving from guidelines to policy to give direction to the senators regarding various financial matters.” But he said the ongoing issue of senators mixing the personal and professional business on trips “strikes a chord with some people.”

Duffy’s lawyer, Donald Bayne said the judgement wasn’t a sweeping precedent for parliamentarians, but a message to other senators about using their expense accounts wisely.

“There are practices that have to be cleared up and rules that have to be tightened up and it’s not enough for the Senate to say or certain members of the Senate to say, ‘well, we know what’s intended.’ Everybody has to know what’s intended,” Bayne told reporters outside the courthouse.

Sen. Larry Smith, a former executive on the Senate’s internal economy committee that oversees spending rules, said those rules were and remain clear.

“As senators, our job is not only to serve the public, but it’s to make sure that we’re able to understand the rules and make a decision at the end of the day which is based on one thing: Is it the right thing to do in terms of spending taxpayers money. So all of us are judged.”

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‘We’re at risk of losing a lot of species’: The race to save Canada’s wildlife

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From the mighty polar bear to the wee bumblebee, Canada is at risk of losing its diverse abundance of species as the earth warms up.

Canadian researchers are working feverishly to change our ecosystems’ fates.

READ MORE: Reality check—Clearing up misconceptions Canadians have about climate change

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“We’re at risk of losing a lot of species,” says Laura Coristine, a 2016 Liber Ero Fellowship scholar and PhD candidate in the University of Ottawa’s Biology Department. “This isn’t something that we need to say, ‘OK ten years from now we’re going to have lost half our species’, it’s ‘how many species will be left for our children?’”

“Will our children’s children have species left? If we don’t start working on the issue now…there will be substantially fewer, and it will be a very impoverished world that we’re leaving them.”

READ MORE: Arctic sea ice at record winter low for second year in a row

The earth keeps shattering temperature records: 2015 was the warmest year on record, globally, and the months of January, February and March followed suit with each one breaking temperature records.

In an effort to slow the increase in global temperatures, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is in New York City Friday to sign the Paris climate accord. The ambitious accord has more than 150 nations agreeing to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in an effort to halt climate change.

These are some of the at-risk species in Canada

A recent Ontario study warned that polar bears are getting skinny due to thinning ice; another report says they are being forced to swim more, which is particularly hard for bears with young cubs.

“Polar bears are going to be in very tough shape with climate change and shrinking sea ice,” says Gwen Barlee, national policy director for the Wilderness Committee.

WATCH: NASA animation of 2016 record-low Arctic sea ice maximum

Along with the polar bear, ringed seals are another sea-ice dependent animal at risk, Barlee says. And the north Atlantic right whale is highly endangered as the production of their food source, phytoplankton and zooplankton, is reduced due to warmer water.

On dry land the pika, a small mammal, is also at risk, Barlee says, as it scampers north to escape warming habitats.

But some species aren’t moving fast enough as their habitats change around them.

“Bumblebee species, as climate change comes on fast and furious, their range is shifting northward and their southern range is no longer appropriate for them. But they’re not moving northward as their range shifts.”

IN PHOTOS: Some of Canada’s at-risk species

A polar bear swims in the Beaufort Sea.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-A.E. Derocher, Univserity of Alberta

A ringed seal pup, about 2 months old, near Bylot Island, Canada.

Louise Murray / Rex Features

A collared pika.

AP Photo/Becky Bohrer

The tails of three north Atlantic right whales.

AP Photo/Stephan Savoia, File

A bumblebee gathers nectar on a wildflower.

THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP/Robert F. Bukaty

Coristine is working to ease movement and migration for Canada’s species and reduce climate-related wildlife extinction.

“You’ve got two things happening: they’re not moving fast enough as it is, but when there’s habitat fragmentation they go even slower.”

Her focus is to look at the barriers and obstacles, such as highways and other developments impeding the species’ survival and movement, as well as to identify areas that need increased protection.

“Canada has a fairly comprehensive network of observations for climate,” says Coristine. “We’ve got numerous models for predicting as well, so we’ve got a really good data set.”

There are hundreds of conservancy groups working in North America, Coristine says. Working together, they are able identify those key areas, and get the message across to the people, organizations, corporations, and governments who can put their recommendations into action.

WATCH: Trudeau set to sign historic Paris climate agreement

Coristine will be working closely with a number of those groups, including the Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative, Nature Conservancy of Canada, Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, and the University of Calgary and O2 Planning and Design.

READ MORE: Climate change—Why world leaders want to stop Earth from warming 2 C

“It comes at the perfect time because the federal government is committed to improving protected areas and expanding, and looking at climate change mitigation. Part of that does need to be dealing with biodiversity and dealing with how we’re going to move, how we’re going got make sure that they can move fast enough that they’ll survive climate change.”

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Your Manitoba: April 2016

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Your Manitoba April 29; Dauphin, Man.

Submitted by: Debora Crammond

Your Manitoba April 29; Norway House, Man.

Submitted by: Shawn Robertson

Your Manitoba April 29; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Jeremy Desorchers

Your Manitoba April 29; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: James Panas

Your Manitoba April 27; The Pas, Man.

Submitted by: Tim Reisdorf

Your Manitoba April 27; LaBroquerie, Man.

Submitted by: Dylan Cash

Your Manitoba April 27; Lockport, Man.

Submitted by: Mary Tataryn

Your Manitoba April 27; St. Adolphe, Man.

Submitted by: Kelsey Jorgenson

Your Manitoba April 27; Powerview, Man.

Submitted by: Angela Papineau

Your Manitoba April 25; along the Red River, Man.

Submitted by: Harold & Ester Weiss

Your Manitoba April 25; Gretna, Man.

Submitted by: Susie Teichroeb

Your Manitoba April 25; Altona, Man.

Submitted by: Laurie Braun

Your Manitoba April 25; Lee River, Man.

Submitted by: Deb

Your Manitoba April 25; Lac du Bonnet, Man.

Submitted by: Cliff Hanna

Your Manitoba April 21; Westbourne, Man.

Submitted by: Shandi Mourant

Your Manitoba April 21; Westbourne, Man.

Submitted by: Bradley Fidler

Your Manitoba April 21; Oak Hammock Marsh, Man.

Submitted by: Leslie Mehner

Your Manitoba April 21; Lake Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Doug McNiven

Your Manitoba April 21; Gretna, Man.

Submitted by: Susie Teichroeb

Your Manitoba April 18; Lake Winnipeg, Man.

File / Submitted by: Marsha Ostertag

Your Manitoba April 18; Norway House, Man.

Submitted by: Natasha Williams

Your Manitoba April 18; St. Laurent, Man.

Submitted by: Daryle Friesen

Your Manitoba April 14; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Celina Flett

Your Manitoba April 14; Portage la Prairie, Man.

Submitted by: Taralynn Kleemola

Your Manitoba April 14; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Lyndon Campbell

Your Manitoba April 14; Pinawa, Man.

Submitted by: Ken Reddig

Your Manitoba April 14; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Stephen Wragg

Your Manitoba April 12; St. Laurent, Man.

Submitted by: Daryle Friesen

Your Manitoba April 12; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Jeff Vernaus

Your Manitoba April 12; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Cheri Voth

Your Manitoba April 12; Pinawa, Man.

Submitted by: Cindy Stonebridge

Your Manitoba April 12; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: James Panas

Your Manitoba April 1; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Patty Noble

Your Manitoba April 1; Pinawa, Man.

Submitted by: Ken Reddig

Your Manitoba April 1; Oak Hammock Marsh, Man.

Submitted by: MaryAnn Wollman

Your Manitoba April 1; Steinbach, Man.

Submitted by: Wowee Ariza

Your Manitoba April 1; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Priscilla Kerr-Hatae

Your Manitoba April 11; St. Joseph, Man.

Submitted by: Dominique Brais

Your Manitoba April 11; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Carey Schroeder

Your Manitoba April 11; Lake Manitoba.

Submitted by: Jacques Sourisseau

Your Manitoba April 11; Clearwater, Man.

Submitted by: Andre Brandt

Your Manitoba April 11; West St. Paul, Man.

Submitted by: Myrna Kroeker

Your Manitoba April 13; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Emerson Leite

Your Manitoba April 13; Lac du Bonnet, Man.

Submitted by: Rose Schaefer

Your Manitoba April 13; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Annette

Your Manitoba April 13; Dauphin, Man.

Submitted by: Crista Morrison

Your Manitoba April 15; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Barb Lamonica

Your Manitoba April 15; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Maureen Nicholls

Your Manitoba April 15; Gull Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Jim Ritchie

Your Manitoba April 15; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Nancy Guille

Your Manitoba April 15; Pinawa, Man.

Submitted by: Cindy Stonebridge

Your Manitoba April 19; Ste. Anne, Man.

Submitted by: Claudette Gabbs

Your Manitoba April 19; Ste. Anne, Man.

Submitted by: Iris Langlois

Your Manitoba April 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Hugh Page

Your Manitoba April 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Dennis Swayze

Your Manitoba April 19; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Neil Longmuir

Your Manitoba April 22; Chatfield, Man.

Submitted by: Joseph Stogrin

Your Manitoba April 22; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Allan Robertson

Your Manitoba April 22; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Paulo Mendes

Your Manitoba April 22; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Larry Trush

Your Manitoba April 22; Brunkild, Man.

Submitted by: Beate Janssen

Your Manitoba April 26; Morris, Man.

Submitted by: Jennifer Rhymer

Your Manitoba April 26; Sandy Hook, Man.

Submitted by: Joseph Borsa

Your Manitoba April 26; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Annette

Your Manitoba April 26; Big Whiteshell Lake, Man.

Submitted by: Diane Wall

Your Manitoba April 26; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Elva Giesbrecht

Your Manitoba April 27; Whiteshell, Man.

Submitted by: Patty Noble

Your Manitoba April 27; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Nelia Monis

Your Manitoba April 27; Winnipeg, Man.

Submitted by: Thuy Ho


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Mike Duffy trial: Duffy’s acquittal resonates in the Senate

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Senator Mike Duffy has been acquitted of all 31 charges of fraud, breach of trust and bribery and can immediately go back to work in the Senate with a full salary and benefits.

READ MORE: Judge dismisses all charges against Duffy

When approached midday, as it increasingly looked like he would be acquitted, his Senate colleagues greeted the news with mixed emotions.

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“The judge felt that the criteria to be convicted of something like that it’s got to be beyond a reasonable doubt,” said Senator David Smith. “I haven’t seen the words that were used but obviously the judge is not buying it.”

“I don’t think exonerated is the right word. We’re not talking pure as the driven snow. The judge is entitled to say they’ve got to make a case that’s beyond a reasonable doubt and obviously he feels they haven’t made it so far.”

Duffy was acquitted of all charges later that afternoon, and did not speak to reporters as he left the courthouse. A statement by Parliament’s law clerk, Michel Patrice, said that the Senate has taken note of the acquittal and the judgement “gives rise to the reinstatement of Senator Duffy as a member of the Senate in full standing with full salary and office resources.”

WATCH: Mike Duffy leaves courtroom after judge dismisses him of all charges

Senator Jim Munson was also supportive of Duffy early in the day, before the full judgement had been delivered.

“Why do we always rush to judgement? You may have your own feelings about these individual senators, but that’s beside the point,” he said.

He felt that Duffy and two other senators, Pamela Wallin and Patrick Brazeau, were unfairly treated by the Senate and media.

“There were three people, one woman and two men, pleading for their reputation. And pleading to say, ‘Can we have a forum where we can lay out what we did? And did we do it any different than other Senators?’ And the overwhelming majority here said no.’”

WATCH: Duffy’s lawyer on judge dismissing all charges against senator

Some senators were concerned about how the trial might have changed the public’s perception of the Senate. The senate expenses scandal first began in 2012, with questions about whether Duffy spent enough time living in PEI to fulfill his residency requirements as senator for that province. The story continued throughout 2013, and Duffy was finally charged in 2014. Other senators’ expenses were also questioned, and there was an Auditor General report on the issue. Duffy’s trial even briefly became an election issue, with the Conservative government closely questioned on the latest developments.

READ MORE: Key dates in the Mike Duffy trial and Senate expense scandal

“Look, it’s been a difficult time for the Senate for the last three years,” said Senator John Wallace. “All this has been, it’s obviously affected the senators who have been suspended, those that have been charged, it affects all of us. All of our reputations have suffered, our credibility. But we’re going to build that back.”

Senator Doug Black agreed. “This clearly has hurt the reputation of the Senate and the reputation of senators. But you know, that’s behind us. We live and learn. We live and learn and we’re working hard, I know I’m working very, very hard to communicate with Canadians every day that I’m on the job to let them know that we’re here to serve.”

The Senate has already changed some of its expense rules: the rules for travel expenses were changed in 2012, and the residency rules were changed in the midst of the scandal.

Prior to 2012, the Senate travel rules didn’t provide much specific guidance on what was and what wasn’t allowed to be expensed. The tightened rules include a detailed appendix on what can be approved and what can’t. These rules were not in place when Duffy filed the claims he was eventually put on trial for.

WATCH: Mike Duffy’s lawyer, Donald Bayne, said the Senate needs to create clear rules for senators on what they can and cannot do

Wallace thinks that the rules should have been changed sooner. “Many of those shortcomings, to me at least when I read the rules, and I have some experience reading rules, have been evident for many years. Probably could have been rectified sooner, but better late than never,” he said.

Smith thinks that they’re still being improved. “I think the Senate is reacting in the appropriate way to tidy it up, make it very tight so that it’s transparent and defensible,” he said.

As for Duffy, Smith is pretty sure he won’t be involved in any more questionable activities. “There were probably mistakes made. And if he comes back, I’m sure he’ll never make any more.”

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Okanagan facing serious worker shortage

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Catering to an influx of tourists can take some serious manpower and be a challenge for many businesses year round. The Okanagan, a region popular for wine lovers and outdoor enthusiasts, is facing a serious labour shortage, and it is only going to get worse in the years to come.

As part of a weekly series covering unique and interesting places in B.C., Global News reporter Randene Neill looks at two very different businesses that are trying to draw in workers full-time.

Kangaroo Creek Farm

When thinking about what draws visitors to the Okanagan, kangaroos and wallabies may not be what most people have in mind.

“Somebody was telling me the other day that we’re number eight in B.C.,” said Caroline Wightman, owner of Kangaroo Creek Farm, just north of Kelowna.

Wightman’s husband, Greg, said the farm had just over 100,000 visitors last year.

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Kangaroo Creek Farm is set up so the public can wander through the pastures, petting the ‘roos, which were all rescued several years ago during a cull in New Zealand. Along with the kangaroos, visitors can get up close to capybaras, emus, llamas and goats.

But while these animals are unusual in this area, the problem the farm has attracting labour, is not.

“Staff has probably been our greatest challenge… and when we do get them we move heaven and earth to retain them because they’re worth their weight in gold,” the Wightmans said.

 Wineries

For Quails’ Gate, they employ up to 250 people in the summer and the award-winning winery and restaurant in West Kelowna prides itself on local. But that’s an almost impossible feat where employees are concerned.

“Our team recruits from Paris, Montreal, Alberta, B.C. Obviously we’re looking for good, talented people as close to home as possible but right now that’s not possible,” said Quails’ Gate CEO Tony Stewart.

For Corrie Griffiths, director of the Central Okanagan Economic Development Commission, she sees it as a “race for human capital globally.”

The fight to find workers from kangaroo farm hands to doctors, is only going to get worse in the Okanagan. It is estimated 75,000 employees will be needed in the next four years. That’s despite the fact that Statistics Canada says the city of Kelowna currently has the second highest rate of unemployment in the country.

“The Kelowna CMA is the fastest growing population in all of Canada,” Griffiths said.

“We need skilled trades persons. We need housekeepers, we need sommeliers, we need healthcare professionals and specialists.”

The hard part for the Okanagan, according to Stewart, is the fact that people still see it as a seasonal destination.

“That is changing right now,” he said.

“This is going to be Canada’s number one food and wine centre [and] in looking at the future… year round employment is going to be much more sustainable.”

PHOTO GALLERY: Take a visit and see some of the animals at Kangaroo Creek Farm

A pair of baby ‘roos.

Global News

A baby kangaroo.

Global News

Global News reporter Randene Neill gets up and close with one of the ‘roos.

Global News

An albino wallaby.

Global News

What is this? A capybaras.

Global News

Greg Wightman and an emu.

Global News

Birds of a feather… wait. It’s a capybaras and a duck.

Global News

Albino ‘roo and her little one.

Global News

Global News reporter Randene Neill feeding an emu and behind her, a goat.

Global News

Goats on a log at Kangaroo Creek Farm.

Global News

~ with files from Randene Neill

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2 men charged in human trafficking investigation spurred by Alberta victim

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RCMP have charged two men with human trafficking following an investigation that began nearly three months ago.

On Jan. 26, an 18-year-old woman in Lloydminster, Alta. complained she had been forced to have sex and was being held against her will.

That led to a widespread investigation involving various sections of the RCMP in Lloydminster and across Canada. Lloydminster is about 250 kilometres east of Edmonton.

A short time after the investigation began, one man was arrested and held in custody, while police searched for a second man.

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Related

  • Man, woman from Brampton arrested in human trafficking investigation

    Nova Scotia man charged with human trafficking appears in court

  • Issues of human trafficking centre stage as court adjourns Gibson-Skeir case

  • Man accused of human trafficking arrested in Cole Harbour

    The suspect had fled Lloydminster, but was was eventually located in Manitoba, where he was arrested.

    Police have charged Preston Carpenter, 32, of Edmonton, with trafficking in persons, obstruction, fail to comply with probation, possession of property obtained by crime, and possession of a controlled substance.

    Cebien Dieujuste, 28, of Montreal, is charged with trafficking in persons, two counts of sexual assault and assault.

    The victim is a Canadian citizen from Alberta.

    She was given medical treatment after she was initially picked up, and was then provided emotional support from RCMP Victim Services.

    Both accused remain in custody.

    Dieujuste is scheduled to appear in provincial court in St. Paul on April 21 via CCTV.

    Carpenter’s next court date is July 6, also in St. Paul and by CCTV.

    St. Paul is about 200 kilometres northeast of Edmonton.

    Public Safety Canada has more information about human trafficking here.

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Rescheduled Toronto ‘The Who’ concert a headache for out-of-town fans

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Lorne Hussy is a die-hard fan of The Who. He’s seen the legendary rockers nine times. “Montreal in 1972, Detroit in 1975, Buffalo in 1982,” he explains while going through ticket stubs he’s collected throughout the years.

But the tenth show has by far been the most costly for the Newfoundland resident after two unexpected cancellations since October.

“All in all (for tickets and travel) it’s probably around $2,000,” said Erin Radloff, Hussy’s daughter.

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The family purchased the original tickets for a show in October, but the show was cancelled because of a medical issue with one of the members.

“That’s what happens, it’s life – no one’s fault,” said Radloff. But what followed next was a cascade of bad luck that has cost the family much more than the ticket price.

“So we lost some money on our airline tickets on cancellation,” said Hussy. “And then we booked again in March for the April show.”

But the April show was recently pushed back a day because of the Toronto Raptors’ playoff success against the Indiana Pacers.

The concert was moved from Tuesday to Wednesday, April 27 – the day Hussy and his son were suppose to fly out of the city.

“To him it’s priceless. He has to be there,” said Radloff of her father.

He was also expected to reunite with some fellow fans he’s kept in touch with throughout the years in a kind of mini reunion.

“He just said either I don’t go and we lose money on our flights, and I lose the concert tickets. Or we just do it,” explained Radloff.

Early Thursday afternoon the family met more bad news: Hussy was bumped off his flight and put on a waiting list. The opportunity to see his favourite band for the tenth, and perhaps final time, was put in limbo thanks to a snowstorm in Newfoundland that forced a large number of cancellations.

“This is going to be devastated for him,” said Radloff. “We love the Raptors, great for them; but what happens to the people who are travelling to see this concert,” asked Radloff. “I’m sure my father and my brother aren’t the only ones.”

Late Thursday afternoon Air Canada responded via email, revealing the flight had left as expected and records show Hussy was on board.

It appears the show will go on for Lorne Hussy, but the cost has not been music to his years.

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